Photos: Dreama Kattenbraker’s art house | Photo | roanoke.com

Dreama Kattenbraker’s painting, sculptural art and assemblages adorn her home. (l)Handbuilt stoneware piece is called, “Lend a Hand,” and it’s primarily about service and doing things for others and all the good things that come back from that, she said. The other stoneware piece is entitled, “Vulnerability,” because she said she feels vulnerable wtihout the use of her arms and operating without all her parts.

Dreama Kattenbraker’s art decorates the walls of her home along with a few pieces from other artists. The large canvas is titled “Alchemical Poetry.” Her work is colorful, whimsical and dreamlike. The butterfly piece on the left is by Cherly Holz from Aurora, Illinois.

Artist Dreama Kattenbraker with her husband, Gary. In the past, her art has drawn comparisons to “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” and it has been frequently described as “whimsical.” Her husband feels those descriptions don’t quite grasp what his wife’s art is about. “There’s a lot more of an edge to them than people realize,” he says.

Dreama Kattenbraker’s painting, sculptural art and assemblages adorn her home. (l)Handbuilt stoneware piece is called, “Lend a Hand,” and it’s primarily about service and doing things for others and all the good things that come back from that, she said. The other stoneware piece is entitled, “Vulnerability,” because she said she feels vulnerable wtihout the use of her arms and operating without all her parts.

Dreama Kattenbraker’s art decorates the walls of her home along with a few pieces from other artists. The large canvas is titled “Alchemical Poetry.” Her work is colorful, whimsical and dreamlike. The butterfly piece on the left is by Cherly Holz from Aurora, Illinois.

Artist Dreama Kattenbraker with her husband, Gary. In the past, her art has drawn comparisons to “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” and it has been frequently described as “whimsical.” Her husband feels those descriptions don’t quite grasp what his wife’s art is about. “There’s a lot more of an edge to them than people realize,” he says.

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